A Visual History of the L&P Logo

Leggett & Platt has been in business for over a century, but our logo has undergone relatively few changes in that time. The one major change came in the early 1970s, when we moved from a simple “L” to a script typeface. Take a peek through the evolution of our logo!

In the early days, this metal tag was attached to every Leggett product and ultimately became the official logo.

In the early days, this metal tag was attached to every Leggett product and eventually became the official logo. The circle in the design was actually a hole used for fastening the tag to springs and frames. “I love the simplicity of this design,” states Scott Clark, Leggett’s Creative Director. “It’s fascinating how well it holds up–what looked good 100 years ago still looks good today, and that’s not always the case.”

The logo added both weight and depth, evolving from the simple bent line into the block "L". The fastening hole at the top of the tag remained in the trademarked logo.

This version added both weight and depth, evolving from the simple bent line into the block “L”. Clark continues, “The upper part of this design feels more like a word mark whereas the circle L is more likely the official logo.”

The logo was simplified in print advertisements but the primary elements remained: a circular tag, block "L", and the smaller "hole" at the top of the logo.

The “L” tag was simplified but the primary elements remained. Clark points out, “The company now has some history, and it’s added to the design here. The new locations in Kentucky and Texas are also included. Besides print ads, you would also see this painted on the sides of our trucks.”

In the early 1950's, advertisements like this were commonly placed in magazines like Good Housekeeping or Living for Young Homemakers.

In the early 1950’s, advertisements like this were commonly placed in magazines like Good Housekeeping or Living for Young Homemakers.

The "L" tag from the above advertisement. The ad copy stated, "The popular L tag means that Fold-Er-Roll is your best rollaway buy."

The copy from the above advertisement stated, “The popular ‘L’ tag means that Fold-Er-Roll is your best rollaway buy.”

This icon kept the circle tag shape but moved away from the traditional block "L" into a script font while adding a slogan around the outer edge.

“The L and the P were derived from the signature of J.P. Leggett,” according to Clark. “If you see his signature, you’ll see that our current logo resembles his penmanship.”

The first iteration of our current official logo featured a script font. The "L", ampersand, and "P" were highlighted.

When describing the first iteration of our current script logo, Clark draws attention to the ampersand. “You’ll notice that it’s the only thing that really changes between the designs since 1970. Also, back then, these were all hand-lettered without the aid of computers.”

1973 script logo - components people

The script version transitions from the 1971 stacked format to horizontal. At the time, CEO Harry Cornell, Jr. stated that “being a components supplier to the bedding and furniture industries was our greatest opportunity for profitable growth.” Clark notes that as we became more diversified we eventually outgrew the “components people” slogan.

1997 current logo

“There were only two changes made in 1997,” says Clark. “We added the registration mark and adjusted the text slightly. Compressing ‘incorporated’ and shifting it to the right adds some balance to the design.”

Leggett logo

Just this year, the logo became a bit simpler. Our logo is a critical element of our brand because it often gives customers their first glimpse of L&P. This is currently the official company logo.

You'll notice the classic logo has been approved for use as a profile image on Facebook and LinkedIn. The "L" tag anchors our new social media efforts firmly to a rich tradition reaching back over 130 years.

You’ll notice the classic logo has been approved for use as a profile image on Facebook and LinkedIn. Clark loves this approach. “I would love to revisit this design,” he says. “It’s a nod to our roots. It’s so old that it’s become fresh again; it’s much more fresh than some of the designs in between.”

 

Editor’s note: There are some other designs floating around the Leggett offices.
One of them is the “cat in a coil” that was popular for many years. Another is a 3-D representation of “L&P.”¬†According to Clark,¬†neither of those designs was ever an official logo. They were simply icons used by marketing at different times in the company’s history.